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Landing Page Audit: Carter’s

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In a little bit of a departure from our recent sports-related landing pages, this week, we’re taking a look at Carter’s, an online retailer of baby and kid items. Specifically, we’re looking at a Google ad that pops up on the search “kids clothes,” and the landing page that the ad takes you to. Here’s the Google ad:

Clicking on that Google ad takes you to this page:

So what do our optimization experts think?

THE GOOD

The Layout: The two columns make for easy navigating. Even though we weren’t specific in our Google search, Carter’s decides we probably meant to be specific.

The Design: We love that it’s minimalist and easy to find what you’re looking for.

The Bar at the Bottom:

“I love the bar that includes email, whats new and social media. It really stands out in a way that is not obnoxious.” –Brandon Houlihan, Interactive Designer

The Search Feature: Since we came in with such a vague keyword, it’s great to see a search box that you can use to search the entire site, and narrow it down by item type as well.

AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT

The Consistency Between the Ad and Landing Page:

“Given that the ad refers to 40% Off, there should be a prominent ‘Sale’ button on the landing page, or a matching offer. Also, the reference in the ad to ‘$6 Bodysuit Doorbusters’ isn’t mentioned anywhere on the landing page, and the $6 flat rate shipping noted on the landing page isn’t mentioned in the ad.” –Jenni Bruckman, Client Manager

The Functionality:

“There is a strong red box/button in the top right mentioning the special Pajama Program – however, it is not functioning.” –Matt Berglund, Creative Director

The Design: We think the text size on the descriptions is a little bit too small. It looks like 9 pixels, which is hard to read for a lot of people!

So tell us what you think! Do you agree with our optimization experts? What would you test on the Carter’s landing page?

As always, these are our ideas based on best practices, which don’t necessarily mean they’re the best ideas, period. In testing an idea, sometimes what you think will work better just… doesn’t. Test, test, test!